YOU and reading side effects of prescription drugs and everything

else.

The following is information from startnews.com and it is for you

to know.

A recent study found that, while about 80 percent of those viewing

risk information for a fictitious allergy drug claimed to have read at

least half or more of the warnings, an eye-tracking tool found that

they actually read little to none of the cautionary material on a

product website.  Of 29 people, eight did not read any of the sides

effect disclosure, some of which was supposedly unique to this

medicine.

In general, the participants-all of whom had been diagnosed with

a seasonal allergy and reported suffering symptoms during the

past year-had a very low recall level.  Of 12 side effects

mentioned, on average, the participants correctly recalled just

one.  And nearly 45 percent did not recall any risks, while 17

percent recalled just one risk.

The goal of the study was to assess the extent to which people

actually, absorb risk information as they scroll along a product

the website, since previous studies showed mixed results when

researchers have relied on trial participants to report whether they

read anything.  This explains why the researchers relied on eye-

tracking tools, as well as a survey to then, assess recollections.

The following is from consumerreports.org and they say that there

are 5 things you can do to stay safe:

Confirm that you understand the basics of your medication:  how

much should you take, when, and how often.  Take time to the

pharmacy counter to talk with the pharmacist.  Even if he or she

seems busy, do not feel reluctant to ask.

Ask about food, supplements, and vitamins that should be

avoided.  And what about alcohol

Ask about the possible side effects, both common and rare, as

well as which is the most serious

Read the patient information sheets that come either stuffed into

or stapled to the prescription bottle bag

Determine when you can stop taking the medication.

I have always believed the Pharmacist knows more about your

medication and interaction and side effects than your doctor.

Be aware when taking prescription drugs.  READ the insert and

ask the pharmacist question

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